An appeal for unity was the primary theme of Rep. Fred Love’s address during Monday’s Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration at Third Street Baptist Church.

An appeal for unity was the primary theme of Rep. Fred Love’s address during Monday’s Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration at Third Street Baptist Church.
Love, who is the product of a single-family household, said service to mankind was one of the many lessons his mother instilled in him as a child.
“These words would shape most of my life. Just like it would shape Dr. King’s life,” Love said.
Based on his outlook on society, Love noted there is a lack of unity in America.
“We’re seeing a divide in race relations, in the haves and the have nots, in education and in wealth. Today my friends, now more than ever, we need unity,” said Love.
Love then asked what message would Dr. King have for America today.
“Dr. King was a unifying presence,” Love said.
Using various quotes from Dr. King, Love stated the the “U” in unity could be considered the ultimate measure of a man.
“Friends, we are at a crossroads in Arkansas and in this country. We have to realize that in order to obtain unity we are going to have to face some challenging times. It is not always going to be comfortable and it may put us in the middle of controversy,” said Love.
Referring to the recent police shooting that resulted in the death of a 17-year-old in Little Rock. While the incident was a tragedy, Love said the community must face the tough conversation of the total lack of respect and disregard young people have for authority.
“This lack of respect is preventing unity within our family structures, our relationship with our law enforcement and ultimately, in our communities,” Love said.
Regardless of what actions one may or may not take, Love said individuals must put on the mindset of Dr. King by standing in the gap, even when situations may not be comfortable.
Shifting to the “N”, Love said it is important to nonviolent.
According to Love, individuals must follow the words of Dr. King by refusing to hate one another.
“In this day and time we have to watch what we are thinking. Violence begins with a thought, not an action,” said Love.
Love believes the key to nonviolence begins with a renewed mind.
“This includes praying for our leaders,” said Love.
The “I” in unity refers to interrelated.
“Whatever affects one directly affects all indirectly. I can never be all I ought to be until you are what you ought to be,” Love said.
Love said he finds it perplexing how individuals do not take into consideration the needs of others.
“I say this because we are in a country where there are gaps that are growing,” Love said.
According to Love, the “T” in unity stands for time.
Using a quote from Dr. King, Love said “the time is alright right to do what is right.”
The “Y” in unity stands for you.
“Faith is taking the first step even when you don’t see the whole staircase,” said Love.
“Do you have the faith to believe that you can make a difference? Do you have the faith to step out on God’s word to be a difference maker, a game changer, a Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.?