During the June 6 Board of Directors meeting, Anita Wiley, building department supervisor, addressed the board about an ordinance concerning the use of a boarding house in the R-2 zone, specifically the 225 N. 13th street property.

During the June 6 Board of Directors meeting, Anita Wiley, building department supervisor, addressed the board about an ordinance concerning the use of a boarding house in the R-2 zone, specifically the 225 N. 13th street property.
Wiley explained that property owners from the area have expressed their concerns with “preserving the integrity of their neighborhood.”
“They want us to preserve single-family and two-family uses and keep that nice, quiet environment in their neighborhoods and they’re really not wanting multi-family type uses, which would be associated with the rooming and boarding houses in their neighborhoods.”
“We’re trying to help them protect their neighborhoods and help them to enjoy their lifestyle there by removing the rooming and boarding houses from the R-2 permitted uses.”
According to Wiley, the planning commission has studied the issue and agree with the property owners
“They have voted to recommend that you all consider approving this.”
Mayor James Calhoun asked if a public hearing had been held regarding the matter, to which Wiley confirmed in the affirmative. Roland Gosey then inquired as to whether the people in question attended this meeting.
“They actually did not come, which was kind of surprising, but they had shown up previously at other meetings.”
Gosey next asked what instigated this proposed ordinance in the fist place, be it noise or an abundance of traffic.
Wiley responded that they had received from neighbors were because a property owner was allegedly attempting to rent out rooms in a single-family dwelling. This does not comply with the zoning ordinance except when operating in official rooming and boarding houses. This prompted Gosey to ask that these were not official rooming/boarding houses, to which Wiley stated no.
City Manager Gary Brinkley then joined the conversation.
“The requirements for a boarding house are very extensive in your ordinance. It requires someone to serve food there and to tend to the house, not just rent out the single rooms. So there were already some in congruencies with the way their interpretation was from the way it was being marketed and so that needed to be cleaned up.”
Wiley agreed.
“And that’s more of a multi-type use which they really don’t think is compatible with their neighborhood and they would like to keep it with single and two-family dwellings and not have that kind of property use going on in their neighborhood.”
For clarification, Ward 2 Director Mark Overturf asked that if approved, the ordinance would disallow rooming and boarding houses for R-2.
“That’s correct,” Wiley replied.
When asked if they were allowed in R-3, Wiley said she thinks it is C-4. Brinkley stated that multi-families are allowed.
“Your compatibility is still there,” he said.
Gosey asked that, while boarding houses were not necessarily being banished, if someone wishes to do one, they have to abide by the requirements.
“Yes, the C-4 zoning district, it also includes multi-family residential uses, so, you know, it wouldn’t be that much of an incompatibility in the C-4 as there would in the R-2 because you already have multi-family and quiet office use in the C-4 zoning district where you don’t in R-2.
It was then again asserted that boarding houses were not being totally excluded; just moved from the R-2 zone.
The ordinance was then moved to have its first reading, which was done and then moved for its second reading.
Next, the board approved the authorization of Assistant Mayor Scott Byrd and new City Manager Brinkley to facilitate the signing of checks. There are now four with such authorization, with the other two being Treasurer Jennifer Story and the mayor.