The Clark County Quorum Court approved the operating budget for 2011 during their regular meeting Monday evening, though the Justices of the Peace discussed the financial situation at length.

The Clark County Quorum Court approved the operating budget for 2011 during their regular meeting Monday evening, though the Justices of the Peace discussed the financial situation at length.
Jonathan Huber, who was serving the court for his last meeting, brought up the policy of county employees being paid by tenure, not by merit.
Huber said he thought that the budget should account for a disparagement between several long-tenured workers within the county who were making less money than others in similar positions who had not been there as long. One example he cited was a woman who, as a supervisor, makes less than someone who works under her.
Several court members backed up Huber’s concerns, and JP’s unanimously agreed to have the budget committee look into disparagement in the salaries of county employees.
The budget itself was then approved, with Huber being the only member of the court to say “no” to its approval.
Meanwhile, two other items were approved during the meeting.
Court member Albert Neal sponsored, as worded in the agenda, “a resolution establishing a policy prohibiting the use of excessive force by law enforcement agencies within the applicant’s jurisdiction against individuals engaged in non-violent civil rights demonstrations.”
The resolution went on to state that the court would “be mindful and protective of the right of all participants in such demonstrations” and that “the use of force shall be permitted only when necessary to protect the right of individuals or to uphold the law.”
The other item approved was, as listed in the agenda, “an ordinance determining the distribution of funds received under Act 799 of 2003 for fish and wildlife conservation.” It was sponsored by Jerry Buck.
Essentially, the ordinance states that “it is the intent of the Clark County Quorum Court that all funds distributed by authority of this Ordinance be used for educational programs that meet conservation education criteria as approved by the Arkansas Department of Education.”
An emergency was declared because the funds needed “to be disbursed to facilitate conservation education in Clark County,” and so the ordinance is now “in full force and effect” as of its passing.