A group of citizens and community leaders are scheduled to meet Thursday to talk about possible changes to the city’s personnel policy.

Mayor Alan Dillavou said Wednesday that some City Council members will be involved in the discussion, which will include a proposal to set office hours for those who work in City Hall. “We may have to tweak it a little bit,” Dillavou said.

A group of citizens and community leaders are scheduled to meet Thursday to talk about possible changes to the city’s personnel policy.
Mayor Alan Dillavou said Wednesday that some City Council members will be involved in the discussion, which will include a proposal to set office hours for those who work in City Hall. “We may have to tweak it a little bit,” Dillavou said.
Currently, there is no set policy as to what hours someone may work, and there have been arguments in the past between Dillavou and Recorder/Treasurer Sarah Roberts regarding her hours. Roberts often works at night, but Dillavou and others argue that she should work only during regular business hours.
“If we’re going to tell people when to be at work and when not to, we need to set the hours in the policy,” Dillavou said.
Roberts said, depending on what time of year it is, she works at night because “I can’t get it all done. I do work during the day.” She said she worked Tuesday from 9 a.m. until 11 p.m. “Right now, I’m trying to get the final reports done for last year, the W-2s and 1099 forms.” She said she works nights at least two to three times per week, but “not every week. It just depends on what I have to do.”
Business hours at City Hall are 8 a.m. until 4 p.m., and the office is sometimes closed for the noon hour.
Roberts agrees with Dillavou that change needs to be made to the policy. “It doesn’t say anything about office hours. There needs to be something in there to tell when the office is open or when employees” should be at work.
But she feels that, since she is an elected official, the policy should not ban her from working at night. “The personnel policy is for employees, and does not affect me, because I’m an elected official,” she said. “It also doesn’t affect the mayor or aldermen.”
Dillavou said Roberts’ hours “need to be discussed because she doesn’t have any set hours. I know some folks around town that would like to see something in writing of when she’s supposed to be at work.”
Dillavou said the meeting will also address benefits given to part-time employees, who currently receive seven days of vacation and seven sick days per year. “I looked at (benefits given to part-time employees in) different cities around the state ... part-time people don’t get any benefits in other cities.”
The meeting is scheduled to begin at 6 p.m. in City Hall, and the public is invited.